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May 3

Google Maps Adds 'Seven Bridges' Imagery for Math Fanatics

Six months after Sandy, a Rockaway school is still struggling

This is a must-read.

Dorsi said money isn’t what makes a school whole again. “You can’t just plop down resources and expect that culture to be rebuilt.”

He repeated himself. “It’s the culture that was lost.”

(via @gothamschools)


Lovely addition to these vintage ads for libraries and reading.

Lovely addition to these vintage ads for libraries and reading.

(Source: explore-blog)

The Illusion of the “Gifted” Child | TIME.com

Interesting commentary from Andy Rotherham here:

In New York City, like many school districts, giftedness is decided by a standardized test that measures verbal and non-verbal facility. Score at the 90th percentile and you make the cut for some programs, but at the 97th percentile students become eligible for the highly competitive citywide options for gifted students. The problem isn’t the test, per se, it’s the false precision that comes with it.

world-shaker:

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick

“Of all the subjects on earth, people think math is the most fixed,” Dweck said. “It’s a gift, you either have it or you don’t. And that it’s most indicative of your intelligence.” This attitude presents an especially sticky problem to educators working to boost girls’ interest and passion for science, technology, engineering and math – STEM subjects. For many boys, believing math is a fixed ability doesn’t hamper achievement — they just assume they have it, Dweck said. But girls don’t seem to possess that same confidence, and in their efforts to achieve perfection, Dweck’s research shows they shy away from subjects where they might fail.
“We have research showing that women who believe math is an acquired set of skills, not a gift you have or don’t have, fare very well,” Dweck said. “Even when they have a period of difficulty and even when they’re in an environment that they say is full of negative stereotyping.” This research suggests parents and educators should rethink what implicit and explicit messages are being sent to young girls about achievement.


Interesting to think about math as a subject where students are more likely to get stuck by having a fixed mindset. How many of you reading this have ever said “I’m not a math person!” one time or another?

world-shaker:

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick

“Of all the subjects on earth, people think math is the most fixed,” Dweck said. “It’s a gift, you either have it or you don’t. And that it’s most indicative of your intelligence.” This attitude presents an especially sticky problem to educators working to boost girls’ interest and passion for science, technology, engineering and math – STEM subjects. For many boys, believing math is a fixed ability doesn’t hamper achievement — they just assume they have it, Dweck said. But girls don’t seem to possess that same confidence, and in their efforts to achieve perfection, Dweck’s research shows they shy away from subjects where they might fail.

“We have research showing that women who believe math is an acquired set of skills, not a gift you have or don’t have, fare very well,” Dweck said. “Even when they have a period of difficulty and even when they’re in an environment that they say is full of negative stereotyping.” This research suggests parents and educators should rethink what implicit and explicit messages are being sent to young girls about achievement.

Interesting to think about math as a subject where students are more likely to get stuck by having a fixed mindset. How many of you reading this have ever said “I’m not a math person!” one time or another?

theatlantic:

Here’s How Little Math Americans Actually Use at Work

Less than a quarter of employees do any calculations more complicated than basic fractions, and blue-collar workers generally do more advanced math than their white-collar friends.

Read more. [Data: Michael Handel]

People are using math in their jobs and in their lives more than they realize. The point of learning math is less about needing to apply algebraic equations or to graph functions or to prove theorems in the workplace. It’s about learning to solve problems quantitatively. Estimating. Taking measurements. Seeing the relationships between things and how one affects the other. It’s about the reasoning skills you learn more than the algorithms you memorize.

Apr 8

GREAT promo video here for Donors Choose. That moment when the student started crying… Wow.

Need some education bingo cards for the State of the Union tonight?

Who’s playin’?

englishmajormade:

Here we go, Common Core. I have to admit, these DoK (Depth of Knowledge) levels are pretty awesome. I like the focus on increasing “cognitive rigor” to emphasize critical thinking instead of just fact learning. I’m scared for the shift away from fiction to make room for more nonfiction (in an English classroom). However, all of the examples I’ve seen for math, science, and social studies classrooms are fantastic, in my opinion. 

This is great. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge chart (link to PDF). Reflects Common Core shift toward higher level reading and writing skills.

englishmajormade:

Here we go, Common Core. I have to admit, these DoK (Depth of Knowledge) levels are pretty awesome. I like the focus on increasing “cognitive rigor” to emphasize critical thinking instead of just fact learning. I’m scared for the shift away from fiction to make room for more nonfiction (in an English classroom). However, all of the examples I’ve seen for math, science, and social studies classrooms are fantastic, in my opinion. 

This is great. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge chart (link to PDF). Reflects Common Core shift toward higher level reading and writing skills.

leilockheart:

Creativity is intelligence having fun - Albert Einstein

leilockheart:

Creativity is intelligence having fun - Albert Einstein